Greek Myth, Magic & Plant Lore
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Greek Mythological Terms, Places & Names

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

B

Boeotia (Βοιωτια)

a region in central Greece (learn more)

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D

Dryad (δρυας)

a tree nymph (plural: dryads, δρυάδες); protects and dwells in trees, woodlands, and groves; although the term dryad has come to mean any tree nymph, it is also specifically used for nymphs of the oak tree, while other names are associated with other types of trees. For example, oreiad (coniferous trees), daphnis (bay laurel), morea (mulberry), aigeiros (black poplar), ptelea (elm), syke (fig) and many more.

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E

Echo (Ηχω)

an oreiad of a conifer grove on Mount Kithairon in Boeotia of central Greece

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K

Kifisos or Cephissus (Κηφισος)

god of the river Kifisos; the river, called Boeotian Kifisos, runs through central Greece starting on Mount Parnassos and flowing east through the region of Boeotia; father of Narcissus by the naiad Liriope

Kithairon or Cithaeron (Κιθαιρων)

a mountain in central Greece, in the region of Boeotia; the alleged location of Echo’s grove and the place of Narcissus’s demise

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L

Lampada (λαμπας)

an underworld nymph (plural: lampads or lampades, λαμπάδες); they carry torches and accompany Hekate on her night wanderings

Liriope (Λιριοπη)

a naiad of Phokis, a region of central Greece; mother of Narcissus by the river god Kifisos

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M

Maenad (μαιναδα)

a nymph of Dionysos (plural: maenads, μαϊνάδες); known for their frenzied devotion, their name literally means “raving ones;” they reach an ecstatic state through intoxication and dance in honor of their god; most often seen bearing a thyrsus (a pinecone-tipped giant fennel stalk wrapped in ivy), wearing deer or fawn skin, crowned with ivy wreaths or bull helms, and handling or donning serpents; also called bacchae or bacchantes

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N

naiad (Ναϊαδα)

a freshwater nymph (plural: naiads, ναϊάδες); protects and dwells in freshwater springs, streams, rivers, waterfalls, lakes, and marshes; often acts as a guardian to youths as they transition from childhood to adulthood

nereid (νηρεΐς)

a sea nymph (plural: nereids, νηρεΐδες); protects and dwells in the sea, waves, current, seafoam, sea rocks, and sand; often acts as a guardian to fisherfolk, sailors, and seafarers; often seen accompanying Poseidon

Narcissus (Ναρκισσος)

a beautiful youth of the town of Thespiae in Boeotia; child of Liriope and Kifisos; cursed by the goddess Nemesis to fall in love with his own reflection (learn more)

nymph (νυμφη)

a nature spirit of a mountain, forest, meadow, sea, freshwater source or other region (plural: nymphs, νύμφαι); responsible for growing, nurturing, and guarding natural habitats and the plants and animals within it; they often group together to form a deity’s retinue (example, Dionysos’ maenads or Hekate’s lampades) and sometimes are known to nurse a god as an infant. See also: dryad (forest nymph), lampada (underworld nymph), maenad (nymphs of Dionysos), naiad (freshwater nymph), nereid (sea nymph), okeanid (river nymph), oreiad (conifer nymph)

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O

okeanid (οκεανις)

a freshwater nymph (plural: okeanides, ωκεανίδες); protects and dwells in rainclouds, underground rivers, freshwater springs, streams, rivers, waterfalls, lakes, and marshes. See also naiad

oreiad (ορειας)

a mountain conifer nymph (plural: oreiads or oreiades, όρειάδες); protects and dwells in coniferous forests of the mountains, often seen accompanying Artemis. See also: dryad

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P

Phokis/Phocis (Φωκις), Phokida (Φωκιδα)

a region in central Greece (learn more)

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T

Thriai (Θριαι)

three prophetic nymphs of Mount Parnassos near Delphi in Phokis; they governed the art of divination by pebbles and birds of omen; they are strongly associated with bees and are said to have influenced Apollo as a child and also taught the oracular gift to Hermes

Thyrsus (θυρσος)

a pinecone-tipped giant fennel stalk wrapped in ivy, most often carried by the maenads

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